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Nightfall Part 24

"You're a thousand times too good for him. Why are you so good?"

"I'm not good and no more is Lulu." Mrs. Bendish sighed, impressed perhaps by Laura's alien moralities, certainly by her determination. "However, if you won't you won't, and in a way I'm glad, selfishly that is, because of Jack's people. But in that case, dear girl, do get rid of Lawrence! The situation strikes me as fraught with danger. One of those situations where every one says something's sure to happen, and then they're all flabbergasted when it does."

"Bernard is not a formidable enemy," said Mrs. Clowes drily.

"But, yes, Lawrence must go. I'll speak to him tomorrow."

"Why not today?"

"It would spoil our evening."

"Give it up."

"And disappoint Isabel?"

"I don't like it."

"Nor I. But I was forced into it, and I can't break my word to Lawrence and the child. After all, there's no great odds between today and tomorrow. What can happen in twenty-four hours?"

CHAPTER XIII

In after life, when Isabel was destined to look back on that day as the last day of her youth, she recalled no part of it more clearly than wandering up to her own room after an early tea to dress, and flinging herself down on her bed instead of dressing.

She slept next to Val. But while Val's room, sailor-like in its neatness, was bare as any garret and got no sun at all, Isabel's was comfortable in a shabby way and faced south and west over the garden: an autumn garden now, bathed in westering sunshine, fortified from the valley by a carved gold height of beech trees, open on every other side over sunburnt moorland pale and rough as a stubble-field in its autumn feathering of light brown grasses and seedling flowers aflicker in a west wind.

Tonight however Isabel saw nothing of it, she lay as if asleep, her face hidden in her pillow: she, the most active person in the house, who was never tired like Val nor lazy like Rowsley!

Conscience pricked her, but she was muffled so thick in happiness that she scarcely felt it: the fancies that floated into her mind frightened her, and yet they were too sweet to banish: and then after all were they wrong?

Always on clear evenings the sun flung a great ray across her wall, turning the faded pale green paper into a liquid gold-green like sunlit water, evoking a dusty gleam from her mirror, and deepening the shadows in an old mezzo tint of Botticelli's Spring which was pinned up where she could gaze at it while she brushed her hair. The room thus illumined was that of a young girl with little time to spare and less money, and an ungrown individual taste not yet critical enough to throw off early loyalties.

There were no other pictures, except an engraving of "The Light of the World," given her by Val, who admired it. There was a tall bookcase, the top shelves devoted to Sweet's "Anglo-Saxon Reader," Lanson's "Histoire de la litterature Francaise," and other textbooks that she was reading for her examination in October, the lower a ragged regiment of novels and verse--"The Three Musketeers," "Typhoon," "Many Inventions," Landor's "Hellenics," "with fondest love from Laura," "Une Vie" and "Fort comme la Mort" in yellow and initialled "Y.B." There were also a big table strewn with papers and books, and a chintz covered box-ottoman into which Isabel bundled all those rubbishing treasures that people who love their past can never make up their weak minds to throw away.

She examined them all in the stream of gold sunlight as if she had never seen them before. It was time to get up and arrange her hair and change into her lace petticoats. If she did not get up at once she would be late and they would lose their train. And it seemed to her that she would die if they lost their train, that she never could survive such a disappointment: and yet she could not bring herself to get up and give over dreaming.

And what dreams they were, oh! what would Val say to them?--And yet again after all were they so wicked?--They were incredibly naif and innocent, and so dim that within twenty-four hours Isabel was to look back on them as a woman looks back on her childhood. She was not ignorant of the mysteries of birth and death. She had lived all her life among the poor, and knew many things which are not included in school curricula, such as the gentle art of keeping children's hair clean, how to divide a four-roomed cottage between a man and wife and six children and a lodger, and what to say when shown "a beautiful corpse": but she had never had a lover of her own. There were no marriageable men in Chilmark--there never are in an English village--and she was too young for Rowsley's brother officers, or they were too young for her. She had dreamed of fairy princes (blases-men-of-the-world, mostly in the Guards or the diplomatic service), but it was never precisely Isabel Stafford whom they clasped to their hearts--no, it was LaSignora Isabella, the star of Covent Garden, or the Lady Isabel de Stafford, a Duke's daughter in disguise. And Lawrence came to her in the mantle of these patrician ghosts.

But--and at this point Isabel hid her face on her arm--he was no ghost: he knew what he wanted and he meant to have it: and it was a far cry from visionary Heroes to Lawrence Hyde in the flesh, son of a Jew, smelling of cigar-smoke, and taking hold of her with his large, fair, overmanicured hands. A far cry even from Val or Jack Bendish: from the cool, mannered Englishman to the hot Oriental blood. When people were engaged they often kissed each other . . . but when it came to imagining oneself . . . one's head against that thick tweed . . . no . . . it must be one of the things that are safe to do but dangerous to dream of doing. Oh, never, never!--But she had been trained in sincerity: and was this cry sincere? Her mind was chaos.

And yet after all why dangerous? Even Laura, Val's adored Laura, had been engaged twice before she married Major Clowes: as for Yvonne, Isabel felt sure she had been kissed many times, and not by Jack Bendish only. Such things happen, then! in real life, not only in books. As for the cigars and the valet . . . and Val's warnings . . . one can't have all one wants in this world!

It contains no ideal heroes: what was it Yvonne had once said?

"Every marriage is either a delusion or a compromise." And Isabel had shortcomings enough of her own: she was irritable, lazy, selfish: read novels when she ought to have been at her lessons: left household jobs undone in the certainty that Val, however tired he was, would do them for her: small sins, but then her temptations were small! Take it by and large, she was probably no better than Captain Hyde except for want of opportunity. And how he would laugh if he heard her say so!

She liked him for laughing. She had been brought up in an atmosphere of scruple. Her father overworked his conscience, treating a question of taste as a moral issue, and drawing no line between great and small--like the man who gave a penny to a beggar and implored him not to spend it on debauchery. Charity and a sense of fun saved Val, but if more lenient to others he was ruthlessly stern to himself. Lawrence blew on Isabel like a breath of sea air. In her reaction she liked his external characteristics, his manner to servants, his expensive clothes and boots, all the signs of money spent freely on himself.

She even liked his politics. Isabel had been brought up all her life to talk politics. Mr. Stafford was a Christian Socialist, a creed which in her private opinion was nicely calculated to produce the maximum of human discomfort: and from a conversation between Hyde and Jack Bendish she had learnt that Hyde was all of her own view. There was no nonsense about him--none of that sweet blind altruism which, as Isabel saw it, only made the altruist and his family so bitterly uncomfortable without doing any good to the poor. The poor? She knew intuitively that servants and porters and waiters would far rather serve Hyde than her father. Mr. Stafford longed to uplift the working classes, but Isabel had never got herself thoroughly convinced that they stood in need of uplifting. Her practical common sense rose in arms against Movements that tried to get them to go to picture galleries instead of picture palaces. Why shouldn't they do as they liked? Does one reform one's friends? Captain Hyde would live and let live.

And he was rich. Few girls as cramped as Isabel could have remained blind to that wide horizon, and she made no pretence of doing so: she was honest with herself and owned that she had always longed to be rich. No one could call her discontented!

her happy sunny temper took life as it came and enjoyed every minute of it, but her tastes were not really simple, though Val thought they were. She had long felt a clear though perfectly good-humoured and philosophic impatience of her narrow scope.

Hyde could give her all and more than all she had ever desired-- foreign countries and fine clothes, books and paintings, and power apparently and the admiration of men . . . Isabel Hyde . . . Mrs. Lawrence Hyde . . . .smiling she tried his name under her breath . . .and suddenly she found herself standing before the mirror, examining her face in its dusky shallows and asking of it the question that has perplexed many a young girl as beautiful as she--"Am I pretty?" She pulled the pins out of her hair and ran a comb through it till it fell this way and that like an Indian veil, darkly burnished and sunset-shot with threads of bronze. "Lawrence has never seen it loose," she reflected: "surely I am rather pretty?" and then "Oh, oh, I shall be late!" and Isabel's dreams were drenched and scattered under the shock of cold water.

Dreamlike the run through the warm September landscape: dreamlike the slip of country platform, where, while Lawrence took their tickets, she and Laura walked up and down and fingered the tall hollyhocks flowering upward in quilled rosettes of lemon-yellow and coral red, like paper lanterns lit by a fairy lamplighter on a spiral stair: and most dreamlike of all the discovery that the Exeter express had been flagged for them and that she was expected to precede Laura into a reserved first class carriage.

It was not more than once or twice in a year that Isabel went by train, and she had never travelled but third class in her life.

How smoothly life runs for those who have great possessions! How polite the railway staff were! The station master himself held open the door for the Wanhope party. Now she knew Mr. Chivers very well, but in all previous intercourse one finger to his cap had been enough for young Miss Isabel. Certainly it was agreeable, this hothouse atmosphere. "Shall you feel cold?"

Lawrence asked, and Isabel, murmuring "No, thank you," blushed in response to the touch of formality in his manner. She felt what women often feel in the early stages of a love affair, that he had been nearer to her when he was not there, than now when they were together in the presence of a third person. She had grown shy and strange before this careless composed man lounging opposite her with his light overcoat thrown open and his crush hat on his knees, conventionally polite, his long legs stretched out sideways to give her and Laura plenty of room.

And Lawrence on the journey neither spoke to her nor watched her, though Isabel shone in borrowed plumes. There had been no time to buy clothes, and so Val, though grudgingly, had allowed Laura and Yvonne to ransack their shelves and presses for Cinderella's adornment. But one glance had painted her portrait for him, tall and slender in a long sealskin coat of Yvonne's which was rulled and collared and flounced with fur, her glossy hair parted on one side and drawn back into what she called a soup-plate of plaits.

Once only he directly addressed her, when Laura loosened her own sables. "Do undo your coat, won't you? It's hot tonight for September."

"I'm not hot, thank you," said Isabel stiffly: but slowly, as if against her will, she opened the collar of her coat and pushed it back from her young neck and the crossed folds of her lace gown.

The gown was very old, it had indeed belonged to Laura Selincourt: it was because Laura loved its soft, graceful, dateless lines that it had survived so long. She had seized on it with her unerring tact: this was right for Isabel, this dim transparency of rosepoint modelling itself over the immature slenderness of nineteen: and she and her maid Catherine and Mrs. Bendish had spent patient hours trying it on and modifying it to suit the fashion of the day. Laura had refused to impose upon Isabel either her own modish elegance or Yvonne's effect of the arresting and bizarre. "Isn't she almost too slight for it?" Yvonne had asked, and Laura for all answer had hummed a little French song--

'Mignonne allons voir si la rose Qui ce matin avoit desclose Sa robe de pourpre au soleil A point perdu ceste vespree I as plis de sa robe pourpree Et son teint au votre pareil . . .'

She discerned in Isabel that quality of beauty, noble, spirited, and yet wistful, which requires a most expensive setting of simplicity. And that was why Isabel opened her coat. If Captain Hyde had admired her in her Chilmark muslin, what would he think of flounce and fold of rose-point of Alencon under Yvonne's perfumed furs? And then she blushed again because the yearning in his eyes made her wonder if he cared after all whether she wore lace or cotton. Everything was so strange!

Strangest of all it was, to the brink of unreality, that Laura evidently remained blind. But Laura was always blind. "Why, she never even sees Val!" reflected Isabel scornfully. And yet-- suppose Isabel were deceiving herself? What if Captain Hyde were not in earnest? But her older self comforted her child's self: careless was he, and composed? "You were not always so composed, Lawrence," in her own mind the elder Isabel mocked him with her sparkling eyes.

Waterloo, lamplit and resonant: the pulsing of many lamps, the hurry of many steps, the flitting by of many faces under an arch of gloom: dark quiet and the scent of violets in a waiting car.

"What a jolly taxi!" Isabel exclaimed. "I never was in a taxi like this before. Is it a more expensive kind?"

"My dear Lawrence, you certainly have the art of making your life run on wheels!" said Laura smiling. "How many telegrams have you sent today?"

"If you do a thing at all you may as well do it in decent comfort," Lawrence replied sententiously. "Half past seven; that'll give us easy time! I booked a table at Malvani's, I thought you would prefer it to one of the big crowded shows."

"Are we going to have supper--dinner I mean--at a restaurant?"

asked Isabel awestruck.

Laurance smiled at her with irrepressible tenderness. "Did you think you weren't going to get anything to eat at all?" He forbore to remind her of her unfortunate allusion to sandwiches-- for which Isabel was grateful to him. "Aren't you hungry?"

"Oh yes: but then I often am. Is Malvani's a very quiet place?"

Lawrence looked at Laura with a comical expression. "What an ass I was! Wouldn't the Ritz have been more to the point?"

"Never mind, sweetheart," said Laura. "Malvani's isn't dowdily quiet. It's the smartest of the smart, and there are always a lot of distinguished people in it. Dear me, how long it is since I've dined in town! Really it's great fun, I feel as if I had come out of a tomb--" she checked herself: but she might have been as indiscreet as she liked, for her companions were not listening. Laura was faintly, very faintly startled by their attitude--Hyde leaning forward in the half-light of the brougham to button Isabel's glove--but she was soon smiling at her own fancy. "Poor Isabel, poor simple Isabel!" She was only a child after all.

A child, but a very gay and winning child, when she came into Malvani's with her long swaying step, direct glance, and joyous mouth. A spirit of excitement sparkled in Isabel tonight, and every movement was a separate and conscious pleasure to her: the physical sensation of walking delicately, the ripple of her skirt over her ankles, the poise of her shoulders under their transparent veil. . . . Laura saw a dozen men turn to look after the Wanhope party, and took no credit for it, though not long ago she had been accustomed to be watched when she moved through a public room. But now she was better pleased to see Isabel admired than to be admired herself.

As they neared their reserved table a man who had been sitting at it rose with an amused smile. "Have you forgotten who I am, Laura?"

"One might as well be even numbers," Lawrence explained. "So, as I knew Selincourt was in town, I wired to him to join us."

A worn, fatigued-looking, but not ungentle rake of forty, Selincourt had stayed once at Wanhope, but the visit had not been a success: indeed Laura had been thankful when it ended before host and guest threw the decanters at each other's heads. That she was pleased to see him now there could be no doubt: she had taken him by both hands and was smiling at him as if she would have liked to fling decorum to the winds and kiss him. Lawrence also smiled but with a touch of finesse. His plan was working.

Laura was going to enjoy herself: bon! he was truly fond of Laura and delighted to give her pleasure. But by it he would be left free to devote himself to Isabel.

It was to this end that he had planned the entire expedition. At Chilmark they met continually in the same setting, and he had no means of printing a fresh image of himself on her mind, but here he was free of country customs, a rich man among his equals, an expert in the art of "doing oneself well"--one of those who rule over modern civilization by divine right of a chequebook and a trained manner. Isabel had been brought up by High Churchmen, had she? Let them test what hold they had of her! Every aspect of their journey and of the supper-table at Malvani's, with its heady music and smell of rich food and wines, had been calculated to produce a certain effect--an intoxication of excitement and pleasure. And he set himself to stamp his own impression on Isabel, naming to her, in his soft, isolating undertones, the notable men and women in the room, describing their careers, their finances, even their scandals--it amused him to watch her repress a start. It amused him still more to stand up and shake hands when the immense body and Hebraic nose of an international financier went by with two great ladies and a cabinet minister in tow. "One of my countrymen," Hyde turned to Isabel with a mocking smile. "I am a citizen of no mean city. Those--" with an imperceptible jerk of the head--"would lick the dust off his boots to find out what line the Jew bankers mean to take in the Syrian question. They might as well lick mine."

"Why, do you know?" breathed Isabel.

Chapter end

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  new
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 Chapter 554 New
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 Chapter 552 New
 Chapter 551 New
 Chapter 550 New
 Chapter 549 New
 Chapter 548 New
 Chapter 547 New
 Chapter 546 New
 Chapter 545 New
 Chapter 544 New
 Chapter 543 New
 Chapter 542 New
 Chapter 541 New
 Chapter 540 New
 Chapter 539 New
 Chapter 538 New
 Chapter 537
 Chapter 536
 Chapter 535
 Chapter 534
 Chapter 533
 Chapter 532
 Chapter 531
 Chapter 530
 Chapter 529
 Chapter 528: Frosted Red Maple Leaves, Riders in Black
 Chapter 527: The Shabby Temple in Autumn
 Chapter 526
 Chapter 525
 Chapter 524: Can't Leave the Green Hill
 Chapter 523: Candy of Life
 Chapter 522
 Chapter 521: Heaven's Orders and Darkness
 Chapter 520: Gray-eyed Cub
 Chapter 519
 Chapter 518
 Chapter 517
 Chapter 516: Prophecy of the Broken Beam
 Chapter 515
 Chapter 514
 Chapter 513
 Chapter 512
 Chapter 511: The Lonesome Mountain
 Chapter 510
 Chapter 509: Heart's Blood
 Chapter 508
 Chapter 507: The Black Horse Carriage with A Sunroof
 Chapter 506: Disappointed before Parting
 Chapter 505: Small Pills
 Chapter 504
 Chapter 503: Just Because of One More Look at You
 Chapter 502
 Chapter 501
 Chapter 500
 Chapter 499
 Chapter 498
 Chapter 497
 Chapter 496: The Story of Spring(III)
 Chapter 495: The Story of Spring (II)
 Chapter 494
 Chapter 493
 Chapter 492: Tomb Sweeping
 Chapter 491
 Chapter 490: The Same World, the Different Thoughts
 Chapter 489: Friends from the Same Sect and Enemies in the Winter Forest
 Chapter 488: After Your Death
 Chapter 487
 Chapter 486: Lullaby
 Chapter 485
 Chapter 484
 Chapter 483: The Open Spear
 Chapter 482
 Chapter 481: The Blood Flag Will Not Fall
 Chapter 480: The Meeting of Iron Flowers and Iron Arrows
 Chapter 479
 Chapter 478
 Chapter 477
 Chapter 476
 Chapter 475: Snowing
 Chapter 474
 Chapter 473
 Chapter 472
 Chapter 471: Blood in the Palm; People on the Bridge
 Chapter 470
 Chapter 469
 Chapter 468: Watching the Snow
 Chapter 467: Winter Solstice Festival
 Chapter 466: Disabusing
 Chapter 465
 Chapter 464
 Chapter 463: Stronger Feeling of Autumn
 Chapter 462
 Chapter 461
 Chapter 460
 Chapter 459
 Chapter 458: The Fisherman and the Invitation
 Chapter 457
 Chapter 456
 Chapter 455: Retiring and Growing Old
 Chapter 454
 Chapter 453: Observing the Sword for A Whole Night and Drawing it
 Chapter 452: Why Fight with Someone Who Was Not in the Same State as Yours?
 Chapter 451
 Chapter 450
 Chapter 449
 Chapter 448
 Chapter 447: The Time Would Come for Stars to Fall
 Chapter 446
 Chapter 445
 Chapter 444: The Arrival of A Maiden Taoist Priest Drenched in the Rain.
 Chapter 443
 Chapter 442
 Chapter 441: Holding Umbrella
 Chapter 440: Planting Lotus
 Chapter 439: Moving Trees
 Chapter 438: Sword Thunder
 Chapter 437
 Chapter 436
 Chapter 435: Blasting the Stream
 Chapter 434: Torn Armor
 Chapter 433: Cutting the Weeds
 Chapter 432
 Chapter 431
 Chapter 430
 Chapter 429
 Chapter 428
 Chapter 427
 Chapter 426
 Chapter 425
 Chapter 424
 Chapter 423
 Chapter 422
 Chapter 421
 Chapter 420
 Chapter 419
 Chapter 418
 Chapter 417
 Chapter 416
 Chapter 415
 Chapter 414
 Chapter 413
 Chapter 412
 Chapter 411: Borrowing the Sword (Part 2)
 Chapter 411
 Chapter 410: Borrowing the Sword (Part 1)
 Chapter 410
 Chapter 409
 Chapter 408
 Chapter 407
 Chapter 406
 Chapter 405: The Academy Is Always Very Polite
 Chapter 404: Why Don't You Give in? (Part 2)
 Chapter 404
 Chapter 403: Why Don't You Give in? (Part 1)
 Chapter 403
 Chapter 402
 Chapter 401
 Chapter 400
 Chapter 399
 Chapter 398
 Chapter 397
 Chapter 396
 Chapter 395
 Chapter 394: The Third Book
 Chapter 393
 Chapter 392
 Chapter 391
 Chapter 390
 Chapter 389
 Chapter 388: Jumping Down From the Waterfall and Talking About Beasts
 Chapter 387
 Chapter 386
 Chapter 385
 Chapter 384
 Chapter 383
 Chapter 382
 Chapter 381
 Chapter 380
 Chapter 379
 Chapter 378
 Chapter 377
 Chapter 376
 Chapter 375
 Chapter 374
 Chapter 373
 Chapter 372
 Chapter 371
 Chapter 370
 Chapter 369
 Chapter 368
 Chapter 367
 Chapter 366
 Chapter 365
 Chapter 364
 Chapter 363
 Chapter 362
 Chapter 361
 Chapter 360
 Chapter 359
 Chapter 358
 Chapter 357
 Chapter 356
 Chapter 355
 Chapter 354
 Chapter 353
 Chapter 352
 Chapter 351
 Chapter 350
 Chapter 349
 Chapter 348
 Chapter 347
 Chapter 346
 Chapter 345
 Chapter 344
 Chapter 343
 Chapter 342
 Chapter 341
 Chapter 340
 Chapter 339
 Chapter 338
 Chapter 337
 Chapter 336
 Chapter 335
 Chapter 334
 Chapter 333
 Chapter 332
 Chapter 331
 Chapter 330
 Chapter 329
 Chapter 328
 Chapter 327: Depressed yet Zealous
 Chapter 326: Everyone Has a Chain on His Neck
 Chapter 325
 Chapter 324
 Chapter 323
 Chapter 322
 Chapter 321
 Chapter 320
 Chapter 319
 Chapter 318
 Chapter 317
 Chapter 316
 Chapter 315
 Chapter 314
 Chapter 313
 Chapter 312
 Chapter 311
 Chapter 310
 Chapter 309
 Chapter 308
 Chapter 307
 Chapter 306
 Chapter 305
 Chapter 304
 Chapter 303
 Chapter 302
 Chapter 301
 Chapter 300
 Chapter 299
 Chapter 298
 Chapter 297
 Chapter 296
 Chapter 295
 Chapter 294
 Chapter 293
 Chapter 292
 Chapter 291
 Chapter 290
 Chapter 289
 Chapter 288
 Chapter 287
 Chapter 286
 Chapter 285
 Chapter 284
 Chapter 283
 Chapter 282
 Chapter 281
 Chapter 280
 Chapter 279
 Chapter 278
 Chapter 277
 Chapter 276
 Chapter 275
 Chapter 274
 Chapter 273
 Chapter 272
 Chapter 271
 Chapter 270
 Chapter 269
 Chapter 268
 Chapter 267
 Chapter 266
 Chapter 265
 Chapter 264
 Chapter 263
 Chapter 262
 Chapter 261
 Chapter 260
 Chapter 259
 Chapter 258
 Chapter 257
 Chapter 256
 Chapter 255
 Chapter 254
 Chapter 253
 Chapter 252
 Chapter 251
 Chapter 250
 Chapter 249
 Chapter 248
 Chapter 247
 Chapter 246
 Chapter 245
 Chapter 244
 Chapter 243
 Chapter 242
 Chapter 241
 Chapter 240
 Chapter 239
 Chapter 238
 Chapter 237
 Chapter 236
 Chapter 235
 Chapter 234
 Chapter 233
 Chapter 232
 Chapter 231
 Chapter 230
 Chapter 229
 Chapter 228
 Chapter 227
 Chapter 226
 Chapter 225
 Chapter 224
 Chapter 223
 Chapter 222
 Chapter 221
 Chapter 220
 Chapter 219
 Chapter 218
 Chapter 217
 Chapter 216
 Chapter 215
 Chapter 214
 Chapter 213
 Chapter 212
 Chapter 211
 Chapter 210
 Chapter 209
 Chapter 208
 Chapter 207
 Chapter 206
 Chapter 205
 Chapter 204
 Chapter 203
 Chapter 202
 Chapter 201
 Chapter 200
 Chapter 199
 Chapter 198
 Chapter 197
 Chapter 196
 Chapter 195
 Chapter 194
 Chapter 193
 Chapter 192
 Chapter 191
 Chapter 190
 Chapter 189
 Chapter 188
 Chapter 187
 Chapter 186
 Chapter 185
 Chapter 184
 Chapter 183
 Chapter 182
 Chapter 181
 Chapter 180
 Chapter 179
 Chapter 178
 Chapter 177
 Chapter 176
 Chapter 175
 Chapter 174
 Chapter 173
 Chapter 172
 Chapter 171
 Chapter 170
 Chapter 169
 Chapter 168
 Chapter 167
 Chapter 166
 Chapter 165
 Chapter 164
 Chapter 163
 Chapter 162
 Chapter 161
 Chapter 160
 Chapter 159
 Chapter 158
 Chapter 157
 Chapter 156
 Chapter 155
 Chapter 154
 Chapter 153
 Chapter 152
 Chapter 151
 Chapter 150
 Chapter 149
 Chapter 148
 Chapter 147
 Chapter 146
 Chapter 145
 Chapter 144
 Chapter 143
 Chapter 143
 Chapter 142
 Chapter 141
 Chapter 141
 Chapter 140
 Chapter 140
 Chapter 139
 Chapter 138
 Chapter 137
 Chapter 136
 Chapter 135
 Chapter 134
 Chapter 133
 Chapter 132
 Chapter 131
 Chapter 130
 Chapter 129
 Chapter 128
 Chapter 127
 Chapter 126
 Chapter 125
 Chapter 124
 Chapter 123
 Chapter 122
 Chapter 121
 Chapter 120
 Chapter 119
 Chapter 118
 Chapter 117
 Chapter 116
 Chapter 115
 Chapter 114
 Chapter 113
 Chapter 112
 Chapter 111
 Chapter 110
 Chapter 109
 Chapter 108
 Chapter 107
 Chapter 106
 Chapter 105
 Chapter 104
 Chapter 103
 Chapter 102
 Chapter 101
 Chapter 100
 Chapter 99
 Chapter 98
 Chapter 97
 Chapter 96
 Chapter 95
 Chapter 94
 Chapter 93
 Chapter 92
 Chapter 91
 Chapter 90
 Chapter 89
 Chapter 88
 Chapter 87
 Chapter 86
 Chapter 85
 Chapter 84
 Chapter 83
 Chapter 82
 Chapter 81
 Chapter 80
 Chapter 79
 Chapter 78
 Chapter 77
 Chapter 76
 Chapter 75
 Chapter 74
 Chapter 73
 Chapter 72
 Chapter 71
 Chapter 70
 Chapter 69
 Chapter 68
 Chapter 67
 Chapter 66
 Chapter 65
 Chapter 64
 Chapter 63
 Chapter 62
 Chapter 61
 Chapter 60
 Chapter 59
 Chapter 58
 Chapter 57
 Chapter 56
 Chapter 55
 Chapter 54
 Chapter 53
 Chapter 52
 Chapter 51
 Chapter 50
 Chapter 49
 Chapter 48
 Chapter 47
 Chapter 46
 Chapter 45
 Chapter 44
 Chapter 43
 Chapter 42
 Chapter 41
 Chapter 40
 Part 39
 Part 38
 Part 37
 Part 36
 Part 35
 Part 34
 Part 33
 Part 32
 Part 31
 Part 30
 Part 29
 Part 28
 Part 27
 Part 26
 Part 25
 Part 24
 Part 23
 Part 22
 Part 21
 Part 20
 Part 19
 Part 18
 Part 17
 Part 16
 Part 15
 Part 14
 Part 13
 Part 12
 Part 11
 Part 10
 Part 9
 Part 8
 Part 7
 Part 6
 Part 5
 Part 4
 Part 3
 Part 2
 Part 1
Chapters
Chapters
 Chapter 573 New
 Chapter 572 New
 Chapter 560 New
 Chapter 557 New
 Chapter 556 New
 Chapter 555 New
 Chapter 554 New
 Chapter 553 New
 Chapter 552 New
 Chapter 551 New
 Chapter 550 New
 Chapter 549 New
 Chapter 548 New
 Chapter 547 New
 Chapter 546 New
 Chapter 545 New
 Chapter 544 New
 Chapter 543 New
 Chapter 542 New
 Chapter 541 New
 Chapter 540 New
 Chapter 539 New
 Chapter 538 New
 Chapter 537
 Chapter 536
 Chapter 535
 Chapter 534
 Chapter 533
 Chapter 532
 Chapter 531
 Chapter 530
 Chapter 529
 Chapter 528: Frosted Red Maple Leaves, Riders in Black
 Chapter 527: The Shabby Temple in Autumn
 Chapter 526
 Chapter 525
 Chapter 524: Can't Leave the Green Hill
 Chapter 523: Candy of Life
 Chapter 522
 Chapter 521: Heaven's Orders and Darkness
 Chapter 520: Gray-eyed Cub
 Chapter 519
 Chapter 518
 Chapter 517
 Chapter 516: Prophecy of the Broken Beam
 Chapter 515
 Chapter 514
 Chapter 513
 Chapter 512
 Chapter 511: The Lonesome Mountain
 Chapter 510
 Chapter 509: Heart's Blood
 Chapter 508
 Chapter 507: The Black Horse Carriage with A Sunroof
 Chapter 506: Disappointed before Parting
 Chapter 505: Small Pills
 Chapter 504
 Chapter 503: Just Because of One More Look at You
 Chapter 502
 Chapter 501
 Chapter 500
 Chapter 499
 Chapter 498
 Chapter 497
 Chapter 496: The Story of Spring(III)
 Chapter 495: The Story of Spring (II)
 Chapter 494
 Chapter 493
 Chapter 492: Tomb Sweeping
 Chapter 491
 Chapter 490: The Same World, the Different Thoughts
 Chapter 489: Friends from the Same Sect and Enemies in the Winter Forest
 Chapter 488: After Your Death
 Chapter 487
 Chapter 486: Lullaby
 Chapter 485
 Chapter 484
 Chapter 483: The Open Spear
 Chapter 482
 Chapter 481: The Blood Flag Will Not Fall
 Chapter 480: The Meeting of Iron Flowers and Iron Arrows
 Chapter 479
 Chapter 478
 Chapter 477
 Chapter 476
 Chapter 475: Snowing
 Chapter 474
 Chapter 473
 Chapter 472
 Chapter 471: Blood in the Palm; People on the Bridge
 Chapter 470
 Chapter 469
 Chapter 468: Watching the Snow
 Chapter 467: Winter Solstice Festival
 Chapter 466: Disabusing
 Chapter 465
 Chapter 464
 Chapter 463: Stronger Feeling of Autumn
 Chapter 462
 Chapter 461
 Chapter 460
 Chapter 459
 Chapter 458: The Fisherman and the Invitation
 Chapter 457
 Chapter 456
 Chapter 455: Retiring and Growing Old
 Chapter 454
 Chapter 453: Observing the Sword for A Whole Night and Drawing it
 Chapter 452: Why Fight with Someone Who Was Not in the Same State as Yours?
 Chapter 451
 Chapter 450
 Chapter 449
 Chapter 448
 Chapter 447: The Time Would Come for Stars to Fall
 Chapter 446
 Chapter 445
 Chapter 444: The Arrival of A Maiden Taoist Priest Drenched in the Rain.
 Chapter 443
 Chapter 442
 Chapter 441: Holding Umbrella
 Chapter 440: Planting Lotus
 Chapter 439: Moving Trees
 Chapter 438: Sword Thunder
 Chapter 437
 Chapter 436
 Chapter 435: Blasting the Stream
 Chapter 434: Torn Armor
 Chapter 433: Cutting the Weeds
 Chapter 432
 Chapter 431
 Chapter 430
 Chapter 429
 Chapter 428
 Chapter 427
 Chapter 426
 Chapter 425
 Chapter 424
 Chapter 423
 Chapter 422
 Chapter 421
 Chapter 420
 Chapter 419
 Chapter 418
 Chapter 417
 Chapter 416
 Chapter 415
 Chapter 414
 Chapter 413
 Chapter 412
 Chapter 411: Borrowing the Sword (Part 2)
 Chapter 411
 Chapter 410: Borrowing the Sword (Part 1)
 Chapter 410
 Chapter 409
 Chapter 408
 Chapter 407
 Chapter 406
 Chapter 405: The Academy Is Always Very Polite
 Chapter 404: Why Don't You Give in? (Part 2)
 Chapter 404
 Chapter 403: Why Don't You Give in? (Part 1)
 Chapter 403
 Chapter 402
 Chapter 401
 Chapter 400
 Chapter 399
 Chapter 398
 Chapter 397
 Chapter 396
 Chapter 395
 Chapter 394: The Third Book
 Chapter 393
 Chapter 392
 Chapter 391
 Chapter 390
 Chapter 389
 Chapter 388: Jumping Down From the Waterfall and Talking About Beasts
 Chapter 387
 Chapter 386
 Chapter 385
 Chapter 384
 Chapter 383
 Chapter 382
 Chapter 381
 Chapter 380
 Chapter 379
 Chapter 378
 Chapter 377
 Chapter 376
 Chapter 375
 Chapter 374
 Chapter 373
 Chapter 372
 Chapter 371
 Chapter 370
 Chapter 369
 Chapter 368
 Chapter 367
 Chapter 366
 Chapter 365
 Chapter 364
 Chapter 363
 Chapter 362
 Chapter 361
 Chapter 360
 Chapter 359
 Chapter 358
 Chapter 357
 Chapter 356
 Chapter 355
 Chapter 354
 Chapter 353
 Chapter 352
 Chapter 351
 Chapter 350
 Chapter 349
 Chapter 348
 Chapter 347
 Chapter 346
 Chapter 345
 Chapter 344
 Chapter 343
 Chapter 342
 Chapter 341
 Chapter 340
 Chapter 339
 Chapter 338
 Chapter 337
 Chapter 336
 Chapter 335
 Chapter 334
 Chapter 333
 Chapter 332
 Chapter 331
 Chapter 330
 Chapter 329
 Chapter 328
 Chapter 327: Depressed yet Zealous
 Chapter 326: Everyone Has a Chain on His Neck
 Chapter 325
 Chapter 324
 Chapter 323
 Chapter 322
 Chapter 321
 Chapter 320
 Chapter 319
 Chapter 318
 Chapter 317
 Chapter 316
 Chapter 315
 Chapter 314
 Chapter 313
 Chapter 312
 Chapter 311
 Chapter 310
 Chapter 309
 Chapter 308
 Chapter 307
 Chapter 306
 Chapter 305
 Chapter 304
 Chapter 303
 Chapter 302
 Chapter 301
 Chapter 300
 Chapter 299
 Chapter 298
 Chapter 297
 Chapter 296
 Chapter 295
 Chapter 294
 Chapter 293
 Chapter 292
 Chapter 291
 Chapter 290
 Chapter 289
 Chapter 288
 Chapter 287
 Chapter 286
 Chapter 285
 Chapter 284
 Chapter 283
 Chapter 282
 Chapter 281
 Chapter 280
 Chapter 279
 Chapter 278
 Chapter 277
 Chapter 276
 Chapter 275
 Chapter 274
 Chapter 273
 Chapter 272
 Chapter 271
 Chapter 270
 Chapter 269
 Chapter 268
 Chapter 267
 Chapter 266
 Chapter 265
 Chapter 264
 Chapter 263
 Chapter 262
 Chapter 261
 Chapter 260
 Chapter 259
 Chapter 258
 Chapter 257
 Chapter 256
 Chapter 255
 Chapter 254
 Chapter 253
 Chapter 252
 Chapter 251
 Chapter 250
 Chapter 249
 Chapter 248
 Chapter 247
 Chapter 246
 Chapter 245
 Chapter 244
 Chapter 243
 Chapter 242
 Chapter 241
 Chapter 240
 Chapter 239
 Chapter 238
 Chapter 237
 Chapter 236
 Chapter 235
 Chapter 234
 Chapter 233
 Chapter 232
 Chapter 231
 Chapter 230
 Chapter 229
 Chapter 228
 Chapter 227
 Chapter 226
 Chapter 225
 Chapter 224
 Chapter 223
 Chapter 222
 Chapter 221
 Chapter 220
 Chapter 219
 Chapter 218
 Chapter 217
 Chapter 216
 Chapter 215
 Chapter 214
 Chapter 213
 Chapter 212
 Chapter 211
 Chapter 210
 Chapter 209
 Chapter 208
 Chapter 207
 Chapter 206
 Chapter 205
 Chapter 204
 Chapter 203
 Chapter 202
 Chapter 201
 Chapter 200
 Chapter 199
 Chapter 198
 Chapter 197
 Chapter 196
 Chapter 195
 Chapter 194
 Chapter 193
 Chapter 192
 Chapter 191
 Chapter 190
 Chapter 189
 Chapter 188
 Chapter 187
 Chapter 186
 Chapter 185
 Chapter 184
 Chapter 183
 Chapter 182
 Chapter 181
 Chapter 180
 Chapter 179
 Chapter 178
 Chapter 177
 Chapter 176
 Chapter 175
 Chapter 174
 Chapter 173
 Chapter 172
 Chapter 171
 Chapter 170
 Chapter 169
 Chapter 168
 Chapter 167
 Chapter 166
 Chapter 165
 Chapter 164
 Chapter 163
 Chapter 162
 Chapter 161
 Chapter 160
 Chapter 159
 Chapter 158
 Chapter 157
 Chapter 156
 Chapter 155
 Chapter 154
 Chapter 153
 Chapter 152
 Chapter 151
 Chapter 150
 Chapter 149
 Chapter 148
 Chapter 147
 Chapter 146
 Chapter 145
 Chapter 144
 Chapter 143
 Chapter 143
 Chapter 142
 Chapter 141
 Chapter 141
 Chapter 140
 Chapter 140
 Chapter 139
 Chapter 138
 Chapter 137
 Chapter 136
 Chapter 135
 Chapter 134
 Chapter 133
 Chapter 132
 Chapter 131
 Chapter 130
 Chapter 129
 Chapter 128
 Chapter 127
 Chapter 126
 Chapter 125
 Chapter 124
 Chapter 123
 Chapter 122
 Chapter 121
 Chapter 120
 Chapter 119
 Chapter 118
 Chapter 117
 Chapter 116
 Chapter 115
 Chapter 114
 Chapter 113
 Chapter 112
 Chapter 111
 Chapter 110
 Chapter 109
 Chapter 108
 Chapter 107
 Chapter 106
 Chapter 105
 Chapter 104
 Chapter 103
 Chapter 102
 Chapter 101
 Chapter 100
 Chapter 99
 Chapter 98
 Chapter 97
 Chapter 96
 Chapter 95
 Chapter 94
 Chapter 93
 Chapter 92
 Chapter 91
 Chapter 90
 Chapter 89
 Chapter 88
 Chapter 87
 Chapter 86
 Chapter 85
 Chapter 84
 Chapter 83
 Chapter 82
 Chapter 81
 Chapter 80
 Chapter 79
 Chapter 78
 Chapter 77
 Chapter 76
 Chapter 75
 Chapter 74
 Chapter 73
 Chapter 72
 Chapter 71
 Chapter 70
 Chapter 69
 Chapter 68
 Chapter 67
 Chapter 66
 Chapter 65
 Chapter 64
 Chapter 63
 Chapter 62
 Chapter 61
 Chapter 60
 Chapter 59
 Chapter 58
 Chapter 57
 Chapter 56
 Chapter 55
 Chapter 54
 Chapter 53
 Chapter 52
 Chapter 51
 Chapter 50
 Chapter 49
 Chapter 48
 Chapter 47
 Chapter 46
 Chapter 45
 Chapter 44
 Chapter 43
 Chapter 42
 Chapter 41
 Chapter 40
 Part 39
 Part 38
 Part 37
 Part 36
 Part 35
 Part 34
 Part 33
 Part 32
 Part 31
 Part 30
 Part 29
 Part 28
 Part 27
 Part 26
 Part 25
 Part 24
 Part 23
 Part 22
 Part 21
 Part 20
 Part 19
 Part 18
 Part 17
 Part 16
 Part 15
 Part 14
 Part 13
 Part 12
 Part 11
 Part 10
 Part 9
 Part 8
 Part 7
 Part 6
 Part 5
 Part 4
 Part 3
 Part 2
 Part 1
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